Society

Polls Show Record-Low Approvals For Both Trump And Ryan

| by Lauren Briggs

In the same week, President Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan have received the lowest approval ratings yet in a Public Policy Polling survey. Though Ryan is now the least popular national politician as measured in polls, Trump's approval ratings remain low across several polls in the week after Republicans put on hold their bill to repeal and replace Obamacare.

Public Policy Polling found that only 40 percent of respondents approve of the job that the president is doing, while 53 percent disapprove. 

On March 28, Trump hit a record-low approval rating with Gallup's tracker, at 35 percent approval and 59 percent disapproval, though it has since climbed to 38 percent and 57 percent, respectively, on March 29. His ratings remain low across the board, however, with a 41 percent average from Real Clear Politics showing a range of scores between 37 percent and 45 percent approval. His disapproval ratings sit at an average of 53 percent, giving him an average spread of -11.6 percent.

Even so, Trump is far from the least-liked politician in the nation, at least according to PPP. That title goes to Republican Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, whom the poll found had only 21 percent approval, while 61 percent of respondents said that they disapproved of the job he is doing. In January, Ryan had 33 percent approval and 43 percent disapproval.

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Indeed, the debate on health care has not helped Republicans with their reputations, as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has reached its most popular rating throughout the entire time that PPP has been measuring it, with a 52 percent majority saying that they approve of Obamacare and 37 percent saying the opposite. Even fewer -- 32 percent -- said that they would like to see the ACA repealed, while 62 percent said that they would like to see the government keep it and fix whatever they need to fix. Only 23 percent said that they support Republicans' American Health Care Act (AHCA), while 56 percent said that they oppose it.

The GOP is taking most of the heat for failing to pass the bill; 52 percent of voters said that the AHCA not passing is Republicans' faults, while 31 percent blamed it on Democrats. While 33 percent of voters (including 13 percent of Republicans) said Trump was to blame for the bill's failure, 42 percent said the same of Ryan, including a full 54 percent of Republicans.

Sources: Public Policy Polling, Gallup, Real Clear Politics / Photo credit: Gage Skidmore/Flickr

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