Society

Polls Show Low Job Approval For Trump

| by Jordan Smith

A number of polls released in late April reveal that President Donald Trump's job approval rating remains low.

The latest survey, conducted by Quinnipiac University, was published April 19 and found 40 percent of respondents approving of the president's performance, CBS News reported.

The poll, carried out from April 12 to 18  found that 56 percent disapproved of Trump.

Quinnipiac's results were similar to those in a Gallup poll released a day earlier, which saw 41 percent saying they approved of Trump's performance and 52 percent registering their disapproval.

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Trump performed somewhat better in a  survey from Harvard-Harris, but this poll still found that a majority -- 52 percent -- of respondents disapproved of the president, compared to 48 percent who approved. The comparable figures from Harvard-Harris in March were 51 percent and 49 percent, respectively.

The survey identified a gender gap, with 55 percent of male registered voters approving of Trump, against 41 percent of female registered voters. Support for Trump among women is down from 44 percent since February.

Male and female voters were divided on the question of who was the stronger leader, Trump or former President Barack Obama, reports The Hill. Females felt the former president was, while male respondents sided with the current commander in chief.

Harvard-Harris conducted its survey online between April 14 and 17.

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On the other hand, the results of a Pew Research poll suggest Trump's support among his base is holding up. Pew found that 92 percent of Republicans and independents thought Trump was doing better or as well as they expected him to do in the job, with 7 percent stating he had done worse than anticipated.

Some are questioning the durability of this support.

"His support even among Republicans is a mile wide but an inch deep," Jeffrey Engel, the director of the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University, told The Christian Science Monitor.

Engel added that Trump's problems in getting legislation passed by Congress are likely to continue. Following the failure to repeal the Affordable Care Act in March, the next task facing the president and congressional Republicans is tax reform.

Some Trump supporters remain prepared to give him time.

"He's trying his best," Loletta Evans said. "They are fighting him tooth and toenail, but he is trying. Of course, I do pray for him every night ... I would like to see him do good and I think his heart is in the right place."

Sources: CBS News, The Hill, The Christian Science Monitor / Photo credit: Shealah Craighead/Wikimedia Commons

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