Back in July of this year, it was reported that the TSA was authorizing valet and parking companies at airports to search people's cars without a warrant.

Some travelers found notes in their cars that read: “Your vehicle has been inspected under TSA regulations" (video below).

However, the TSA tried to distance itself from the car searches on its blog:

While we deploy numerous layers of security, TSA officers are not inspecting cars or mandating that they be searched.

While the airport security plan is approved by the TSA, it is up to each airport authority and its state and local law enforcement partners to follow the plan that has been implemented.

However, a group called "Young Americans for Liberty" recently posted a photograph on their Facebook page taken at the Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport on Nov. 27.

The sign that states: "All cars will be searched by uniformed security as mandated by BAA & TSA.”

If the car searches are indeed "mandated" by the TSA at the Birmingham, Al. airport, then that would contradict the TSA's previous claim.

Back in October, WCNC.com reported that passengers at Charlotte Douglas Airport were having their cars searched and there was not even a sign warning them of the searches.

“I was inside paying my bill. I looked through the window and saw this gentleman looking through my trunk,” said Michelle Zevola, who used the Curbside Valet Service. “He was moving things around, shining a flashlight, going through the compartments. I am so fine being searched at the airport. It’s about safety. But I am not fine with my personal property being searched without permission or notification."

In a circular defense, the Charlotte Douglas Airport claimed that the car searches were required because the Charlotte Douglas Airport's security plan required car searches.

"Our airport security plan requires those vehicles be searched," said Deputy Aviation Director Jack Christine, who admitted that the airport valet services had searched cars for a year and a half, but did not inform passengers.

Sources: Facebook, WCNC.com, TSA.gov