Transgender Teen, Born Female, Seeks to Be Homecoming King in Pa. High School

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When 17-year-old Kasey Caron told his school guidance counselor that he wanted to be on the homecoming court at Richland High School in Pennsylvania, he was asked if he wished to run as a male or a female. Despite being born with female organs, Caron, who identifies as a boy, chose “male.”

Several days later, Kasey received word that he was ineligible to run because his driver’s license states he is female, and state law prohibits him from placing his name on the ballot for homecoming king.

In response, the school, which lies 70 miles from Pittsburgh, switched Caron to the female ballot.

Caron has requested a review of the decision, and claimed he was “disappointed” that the school did not immediately respond. Said Caron, “I thought they were going to have a change of heart. I am still hoping for one.”

School board Solicitor Timothy Leventry said that state law takes precedence over any decision by the school, and that Caron is legally female until he undergoes a sex change and has his birth certificate altered, which he cannot do until his 18th birthday.

Said Leventry, “There is a legal side of this issue and there is a practical side. The school board has looked at the legal side.”

Caron said upon learning of the decision to bar him from the male ballot, "I didn't know at that point if I wanted to be on court, if that was the situation. It just seemed like more of a hassle than just dropping off and letting whoever else go."

Pennsylvania State Senator John Wozniak, D-Westmont, who has a record of fighting discrimination, weighed in on the matter saying, "I think we have to evolve. We have to have the conversation and more public awareness. It's a tough issue, but these are real people, too. We're dealing with a situation where it's uncharted territory here in Pennsylvania."

Caron was born with a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome, which causes the ovaries to produce more male hormones, or androgens, than usual.

Sources: NBC Philadelphia, The Snap Online, Advocate