Man Thought To Be Constipated Had Penis Cancer

| by Jordan Smith
Thomas ManningThomas Manning

A 47-year-old man who went to the doctor because he thought he was constipated has been diagnosed with cancer of the penis.

The anonymous Indian man's case was reported by doctors in a journal article, according to the Daily Mail.

The man sought medical treatment after struggling to go to the bathroom for about a year.

In addition, the man also noticed a thickening of the skin on his penis and swelling.

After examining him, doctors found he had a large cancerous growth in his penis and rectum, which was also spreading into his bladder and prostate. The tumor was about 10 centimeters in size, with 1 centimeter protruding from his anus.

Following blood tests, doctors diagnosed the man with adenocarcinoma.

Surgery was performed to remove part of his colon so that he could still go to the toilet after chemotherapy began. Unfortunately, the growth did not reduce in size following the therapy. The man was ultimately offered painkillers and end-of-life care as doctors said nothing more could be done for him.

Penis cancer is relatively rare, but there are a number of recorded cases.

“Even with many published case reports, clinicians often tend to ignore this rare site where the cancer has spread from, which necessitates a gentle reminder to the clinical community,” the doctors wrote, according to the Mail.

The likelihood of surviving a diagnosis of cancer which has spread to the penis is low. Doctors say a patient can survive up to two years with treatment.

Thomas Manning from Massachusetts proves that survival is possible. He was diagnosed with penis cancer in 2012 and had to have his genitals removed to prevent its spread. He then fought to have pioneering penis transplant surgery.

“I confronted the issue in my life. They amputated my penis and I always believed that there was a possibility of a transplant and I just kept fighting for it,” he said, according to the Mirror.

Manning ultimately underwent a successful, 16-hour-long penis transplant surgery earlier in 2016. Manning hopes other victims of this form of cancer will be able to benefit from similar procedures.

Sources: Daily Mail, Mirror / Photo credit: ITV/Mirror

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