Society

Time's 'Person Of The Year' Cover May Hide Secret (Photo)

| by John Freund

Many are speculating that Time Magazine hid a secret message in its cover photo of President-elect Donald Trump as "Person of the Year." 

GQ reports that there is a widespread belief that Time deliberately placed Trump in a certain position, in order to make a point about "The Donald."

Can you guess what the subtle imagery hints at?  

The cover features Trump sitting throne-like in a chair facing away from the camera. But he is looking over his right shoulder at us, the viewer, with his eyes narrowed and a very stern look on his face.   

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Some have noted that Trump’s head was placed directly under the letter "m" in Time, which makes it appear as if there are two horns -- some might say Devil horns -- protruding from the top of Trump’s head. 

If intentional, this would not be the first time that the magazine has criticized Trump.  In previous issues, Time ran articles which labeled him unfit to be president. 

This image is a bit less overt, and could possibly just be a grand coincidence, but knowing how much specificity goes into a Time Magazine cover -- let alone for their iconic "Person of the Year" -- many feel it's safe to say that there are no coincidences here.  

Time also printed the words, "President of the Divided States of America," beneath Trump’s moniker.  According to The New York Times, Trump was reportedly not happy about the term "divided states of America," but called his selection as Person of the Year a “tremendous honor.”  

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The magazine’s “No. 2” person of the year was former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, with other finalists being Simone Biles, Beyonce, Mark Zuckerberg, and the whistle-blowers of the Flint, Michigan, lead-poisoning crisis. 

Sources: GQ, The New York Times / Photo credit: GQ, Twitter via GQ

Is the imagery of devil horns intentional?
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