Texas Cop Yells At Teen Driver For Smiling, Scolds Passengers (Video)

| by Michael Allen

A video (below) of a police officer in Plano, Texas, yelling at a teen and his passengers for smiling is going viral.

The video was originally posted on Facebook in May, but recently was uploaded to YouTube, where it took off.

The Plano Police Department identified the officer as Jeff Willis, notes the Dallas Morning News.

Willis reportedly stopped the car because one of the passengers gave him the finger.

In the video, Willis repeatedly tells Jose, the 16-year-old driver, to stop smiling and to take the traffic stop seriously, CBS Dallas-Fort Worth reports.

“How are you going to tell me to stop smiling?” Jose asks.

"You want me to keep you here for a little bit longer?" Willis scolds Jose. "We'll stay here as long as you want until you get serious."

Willis then gets mad at a passenger in the back of the car and a passenger in the front seat.

“You in the back, you get one time, and that's it," Willis states. "Next time I see you or I see you, OK, we’ll spend a little more time out here. You too.”

“What did I do?” the front passenger replies.

Willis glares at the front seat passenger: “I don’t know, I just don’t like you. I just don’t like you. I just don’t like you.”

As the cop starts to walk away, and driver and passengers begin to laugh.

Willis stops and says: "Ass---. Keep going. Say something else. Say something else and I’ll drag you out of the car. Say something else and I’ll drag you out of the car.”

Plano Police Department spokesman David Tilley told the Dallas Morning News that the department began an investigation soon after the video was uploaded to Facebook, which would have been May 2.

The investigation found that Willis should be disciplined, but the disciplinary action was not revealed because Willis can file an appeal, according to Tilley.

In 2013, a federal appeals court ruled that flipping off a police officer is a Constitutional right, the Huffington Post reported at the time. In the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit's opinion, they stated that the "ancient gesture of insult is not the basis for a reasonable suspicion of a traffic violation or impending criminal activity."

WARNING: Contains strong language.

Sources: CBS Dallas-Fort Worth, Daniel Acosta/Facebook, Dallas Morning News, Huffington Post

Photo credit: YouTube Screenshot