Society

'She Just Seemed In Shock': 16-Year-Old Girl Survives Plane Crash, Walks For Two Days To Find Help

| by Emily Smith

A 16-year-old girl walked through the woods for two days seeking help after her plane crashed.

The plane had initially taken off from Kallispell, Montana, and then crashed near Omak, Washington, on Saturday, KIRO-TV reported. Autumn Veach, the young victim, later noted that the plane had crashed and caught fire after flying into a bank of clouds.

Veach, as well as her step-grandparents Leland and Sharon Bowman, were aboard the plane when it crashed. When authorities were alerted that the plane had never arrived on Saturday, volunteer pilots began to search for the missing plane on Sunday.

Incredibly, Veach found help before help found her.

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Veach was picked up on Highway 20 near Easy Pass trailhead after walking for two days. When she reached the highway, a driver took her to a local Mazama store on Monday.

Serena Lockwood, the woman who manages the store, said she could hardly believe Beach’s story.

“She had like some branches and twigs in her jacket and some scrapes on her face, but I think the main thing was she just seemed in shock,” Lockwood told KIRO-TV.

Veach was taken to a hospital after an EMT, who was also an employee at the Mazama store, confirmed that she was dehydrated. The dehydration and her other injuries were non-life threatening

According to Veach’s mother Misty Dawn Bowman, Veach’s step-grandparents did not survive the crash, KIRO-TV reported. Authorities are still searching for their bodies.

Lt. Col. Jeffrey Lustick of the Civil Air Patrol noted that teams of rescuers are currently searching for the plane using Veach’s descriptions of the crash site in addition to the last known radar signal before the crash, according to The Guardian.

The search hasn’t been easy.

“These grids contain some of the toughest mountainous terrain in the state,” Julie DeBardelaben, the Civil Air Patrol spokesperson, said.

The Civil Air Patrol’s cell phone forensic and radar teams continue to analyze the data.

Sources: KIRO-TV, The Guardian

Photo Credit: The Guardian, kirotv.com