Society

Teen Discovers $31K Mistakenly Deposited In His Account And Spends It, Now Bank Wants It Back

| by Dominic Kelly
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A Georgia bank accidentally deposited $31,000 into a teen’s account, and now that they’ve realized their mistake, they are asking him to pay it back. Unfortunately for the teenager, most of that money has already been spent.

The mix-up happened on March 7 when a customer named Steven Fields deposited $31,000 into his bank account. The teller mistakenly deposited the large sum of money into a different bank account that happened to belong to someone of the same name. 18-year-old Steven Fields received a notice that the deposit had been made into his account, and instead of notifying the bank that there had been a mistake, he decided to go on a spending spree.

The younger Fields immediately withdrew $20,000 from his account and proceeded to spend another $5,000 on his ATM card. 10 days after the initial mix-up, the correct Steven Fields notified the bank that his money had not been deposited into his account, and that’s when the bank’s staff realized a mistake had been made.

The next day, teenage Steven Fields went to the First Citizens Bank in Hull, Georgia to withdraw more money, but when he arrived, the bank informed him of the mistake and asked him to return the money. According to the officer that was dispatched to the scene on allegations of financial fraud, the 18-year-old told bank staff that the money was from a family inheritance and that it had been direct deposited – both claims that the bank ultimately refuted. Fields told the officer and bank staff that he would go home and retrieve proof of his inheritance, but once he left, he never returned.

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Later on, when police went to Fields’ home to confront him, he informed them that he believed the money came from his grandmother’s estate.

"I informed Mr. Fields that the bank wanted the money back as soon as possible,” wrote an officer in the police report. "Mr. Fields stated that he would go to the bank and talk with Mrs. Bryant and try to settle this situation without going to jail."

Bank officials say they will press charges against the teen if he does not return to settle the matter, and as of the most recent reports, he has yet to do so.