Society

Study: Gender Pay Gap Won't Close Until 2058

| by Jonathan Wolfe
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According to a new study by the Institute for Women’s Police Research (IWPR), the gender wage gap might not close for another 40+ years. Specifically, the study believes the gap will close in the year 2058.

To reach their estimate, researchers charted the rate at which the wage gap has been closing from 1960-2012. Researchers at the IWPR say the estimated date for when the gender-based pay gap will close has actually moved further into the future in recent years.

IWPR President Heidi Hartmann spoke briefly about the organization’s latest report.

"Progress in closing the gender wage gap has stalled during the most recent decade. The wage gap is still at the same level as it was in 2002," Hartmann said. "If the five-decade trend is projected forward, it will take almost another five decades--until 2058--for women to reach pay equity. The majority of today's working women will be well past the ends of their working lives.

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“I’m not sure any of us are convinced we know the real reason why,” she said. “In general there's not enough attention in society to the protections we already have in law.”

According to the US Department of Labor, a full-time, year-round female worker will earn 77 cents for every dollar that what a male worker earns – equaling a 23 cent wage gap. But, the Department of Labor notes that when accounting for control factors like the number of children a worker has and the frequency at which unpaid leave is taken, this gap is sharply reduced. According to the latest estimates, the discriminatory component of the wage gap is 5-8 cents per dollar.

Nevertheless, discrimination is still discrimnation whether it is 23 cents per dollar or five cents per dollar. 

Sources: Huffington Post, IWPR, Wikipedia