Society

King: Trump 'Worse Than Any Horror Story I Ever Wrote'

| by Robert Fowler

Bestselling author Stephen King has blasted President Donald Trump's temperament, asserting that the commander-in-chief's ability to launch a nuclear strike is more frightening than any of his horror stories.

On May 3, King took to accuse Trump of being a clinical narcissist.

"Trump's tweets in his first hundred days draw a pretty clear portrait: he's an almost textbook case of narcissistic personality disorder," King tweeted out.

The author added: "That this guy has his finger on the nuclear trigger is worse than any horror story I ever wrote."

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King is among the most successful authors in the world. He has written over 50 novels and short story collections, which have sold a total of more than 350 million copies.

Nan Graham, editor-in-chief of King's publisher Scribner, believes that the author's popularity stems from his ability to write about working-class Americans, many of whom comprise Trump's base of support.

"One of the things that makes Steve so exceptional is he navigates the line between the common and the supernatural, but he always begins with a common man," Graham told the Washington Post. "Many of his heroes are working-class. They're absolutely from the heartland of America."

King has been a vocal critic of Trump, often comparing the president's political rise to a horror tale.

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"My newest horror story: Once upon a time there was a man named Donald Trump, and he ran for president," King tweeted out in October 2016. "Some people wanted him to win."

On April 1, King reflected on the 2016 election in an editorial for The Guardian. The author revealed that he had suspected Trump had a greater shot at victory than the polls suggested, and that on election night he felt "dismayed, but not particularly surprised."

"I'm from northern New England, and in the run-up to the election I saw hundreds of Trump-Pence signs and bumper stickers, but almost none for Clinton-Kaine," King explained.

The author concluded that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's supporters were not as energized as Trump voters, writing that Americans were "both frightened of the status quo and sick of it."

King also laid out his case for Trump being a clinical narcissist.

"Psychologists mention four basic traits when diagnosing a sociopathic condition known as narcissistic personality disorder," King wrote. "People suffering from this condition believe themselves superior to others, they insist on having the best of everything, they are egocentric and boastful, and they have a tendency to first select love objects, then find them at fault and push them aside."

While King may be concerned about Trump's temperament, he could have his fears of a nuclear strike alleviated.

Democrat Sen. Ed Markey of Massachusetts and Rep. Ted Lieu of California have introduced legislation that would limit Trump's authority to launch a nuclear missile. The Restricting First Use of Nuclear Weapons Act would require that the commander-in-chief obtain congressional approval before launching a nuclear strike, The Hill reports.

On April 3, a petition supporting the bill was presented to Congress. It had been signed by roughly half a million people.

Sources: The Guardian, The HillStephen King/Twitter (2, 3), Washington Post / Photo Credit: Gage Skidmore/Flickr

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