Society

Starbucks Will Display Calorie Counts for Drinks and Food

| by
article imagearticle image

Starbucks calorie counts will now be listed on menus after June 25, and it will exist for not only the drinks but the pastries as well.

Customers will now be aware that Frappuccinos are 230 calories and up, while blueberry scones and morning buns are 460 and 350 calories each.

Starbucks announced the changes at a time when customers are opting for healthier options when eating out. They recognize that listing the calories may be good for business, as they will likely sell healthier options more easily. 

They said they already list nutritional information on their website, and said customers can often reduce their calorie intake significantly by choosing low fat milk, sugar free syrups and no cream.

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Sue Hensley, spokeswoman for the National Restaurant Association, said a "large majority" of food and beverage chains are waiting for the FDA to decide whether or not it will be required to list nutritional info.

Starbucks is one step ahead of the game by implementing the change before the FDA decides new regulations.

Mary Wagner, senior vice president of global research and development, said, "Menu labeling is yet another step to extend our commitment to wellness."

While Starbucks has an optimistic outlook on the new nutritional displays, experts argue whether or not the decision will curb over-eating and lower obesity rates. 

Studies show that people often underestimate the amount of calories they eat, but this does not mean that listing the calories will stop them from eating it. 

Starbucks has posted nutritional information in New York City since 2008, and some studies showed that there was no change in how much people ate. Other studies showed that only 1/6 of customers used nutritional information to decide what to eat.

Sources: Inquisitr, Time