Society

Some Texas Counties Won't Give Birth Certificates Of U.S.-Born Kids To Undocumented Parents

| by Michael Allen
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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump publicly questioned birthright citizenship for children born to undocumented immigrants in the U.S. during the second GOP debate.

Some local officials in Texas are already denying copies of birth certificates to undocumented parents of U.S. born-babies, notes The New York Times.

The officials do this by accepting only certain types of IDs from the parents before issuing the birth certificates to them, but the undocumented parents say they don't have those IDs because of their immigration status.

Technically, the babies are citizens of the U.S. per the 14th Amendment, but without copies of the birth certificates, undocumented immigrants claim they have problems getting their kids into daycare and school, and accessing Medicaid and other government services.

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It used to be that state registrars, who issue birth certificates, would accept consular identification cards, also known as matriculas.

Immigrant advocates say that hundreds of undocumented immigrant parents living in Texas near the Southern border have been denied birth certificates since 2013, noted the Los Angeles Times.

The State of Texas reportedly told local officials not to accept matriculas in response to President Obama's controversial executive action on immigration in 2012.

However, lawyers for the State of Texas have claimed that a lack of a birth certificate will not prevent a child from going to school or getting Medicaid.

According to The New York Times, Texas officials say that undocumented immigrants can use other types of identification to get birth certificates such as student IDs, Medicaid cards, Mexican voter registrations, utility bills and paycheck stubs.

Adults and children from Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico and filed a lawsuit in May against the State of Texas over the denied birth certificates.

The Mexican government, which requires IDs from foreign travelers, has filed a brief in support of the families against Texas.

Sources: The New York Times, Los Angeles Times / Photo Credit: ErgoSum88/Wikimedia