Society

Sex Roulette Parties Reportedly On The Rise In Spain

| by Jordan Smith
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Young people in Spain are reportedly increasingly engaging in so-called sex roulette parties, where one attendee is HIV positive but does not disclose this to other party-goers.

The parties are being attended by people of all sexualities in Barcelona, according to Dazed.

At some of the parties, attendees are given blue pills purchased on the black market which allegedly reduce the risk of contracting HIV.

"There is everything: sex roulette parties, or sex parties you can only attend if you already have HIV," Dr. Josep Mallolas of Barcelona's Hospital Clinic said, according to Daily Mail.

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No figures have been provided on the scale of the trend. The Irish Independent reported that in Barcelona, 4,500 people are currently being treated for HIV by the Hospital Clinic, and about 100 visits related to the disease take place daily.

"Going to sex roulette parties is about the risk, partygoers think the higher the risk, the stronger the thrill," Kate Morley, a psychosexual therapist, told Dazed. "In the case of sex parties the intense high is as you combine orgasm with high adrenaline.

"However the high is short term and the long term consequences are dangerous as not only is there the risk of contracting HIV, but other harmful sexually transmitted infections."

A spokesperson for the Hospital Clinic in Barcelona explained that the increase in roulette parties corresponded with a rise in other sexually transmitted diseases like Chlamydia, gonorrhea and hepatitis C.

Sex roulette parties were previously reported in the media in 2014, with one Spanish newspaper alleging the trend had originated in Colombia.

Among young people aged 15 to 25, 24 percent are reportedly not afraid of the HIV virus.

“We’ve become victims of our own success when it comes to treatment,” Caitlin Maron, a news officer with Avert, told Dazed. “HIV treatment is much more accessible and effective in this era, and people living with HIV are living healthier lives and into old age. As such, many people may feel that becoming infected with HIV isn’t such a big deal.”

She went on to emphasize that while the outlook for HIV carriers has improved, it is still a severe condition which requires daily medication for the rest of an infected person’s life.

Sources: Daily Mail, DazedIrish Independent / Photo Credit: Irish Independent

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