U.S. To Dismantle Conspiracy-Laden HAARP Facility In Alaska

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht

The government is shutting down the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), a military site in Alaska which has long been heralded by conspiracy theorists as the source of all our worst natural disasters.

The $290 million facility funded by the Air Force, Navy, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the University of Alaska has 180 crossed dipoles over 30 acres. Military and civilian scientist use the facility to study how charged particles interact with the ionosphere, 55 to 370 miles above the planet.

Conspiracy theorists claim the government uses the facility to change the weather, disable satellites and even control our minds, the Independent reported. Some believe HAARP is responsible for the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster.

Eric Dubay, a conspiracy blogger and American ex-pat who lives in Thailand, believes HAARP caused the 8.9-magnititude earthquake in Japan in 2011, according to the Alaska Dispatch. Others say it caused the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. It has also been blamed for Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Wilma.

The military announced it would dismantle HAARP in mid-June, saving the government $5 million a year, stating it’s "not an area that we have any need for in the future.”

David Walker, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for science, technology and engineering, said, "We're moving on to other ways of managing the ionosphere.”

“HAARP is not classified,” said the program’s website, before it was shut down last year. “There are no classified documents pertaining to HAARP.”

Scientist David Naiditch said the site was so popular because “its purpose seems deeply mysterious to the scientifically uniformed.”

HAARP is capable of creating artificial northern lights to help predict solar storms – coronal mass ejections that could spell disaster for electronics, including GPS, on Earth. The foremost objective of the program was building better radio communications.

Sources: io9, Independent, Alaska Dispatch

Sources: io9, Independent, Alaska Dispatch