Society

'She Was Crying': Oklahoma Mom Speaks Out After School Sends Daughter Home Over Dyed Hair

| by Jonathan Constante
Sarah BonacciSarah Bonacci

An Oklahoma mother is outraged after her daughter was sent home from school for violating dress code policy because of her dyed hair.

When Sarah Bonacci went to school at Emerson Alternative in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on Oct. 5, she was denied entry because of the color of her hair, KFOR reported. She called her mom after being turned away.

“They told her to leave because her hair color was not a natural color,” the girl’s mother, Vanessa Tucker, told KFOR. “She’s not allowed to wear red-colored hair to school.

“She was crying, she was upset.”

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Tucker contacted school administrators.

“When I called this morning and asked if she could come to school, he told me she was not allowed on school property with her hair the color it is,” Tucker said. “He told me that he would go around to her teachers and tell them she is not allowed to get her school work until she gets her hair changed.”

Tucker added that the assistant principal also told her that Sarah knew the policy regarding hair color and chose to disobey it anyway.

Emerson High School’s dress code states that hair “must be of natural color." Red, blue, pink and purple hair were listed as unacceptable colors.

“If her hair was blue, green, purple, orange, like a clown, I can understand, or red like he thinks her hair is,” Tucker told News 9. “I don’t feel that her hair color is an unnatural hair color.”

Tucker said she can’t change her daughter’s hair color without severely damaging it, but the school administrators allegedly did not care.

“He had told her that she could come back in six months when she could color it back to her natural color,” said Tucker.

School officials told Tucker that her daughter could come back to school if she wore a wig. Tucker said she already tried dying her daughter’s hair brown, but the red pigment was still visible.

“I’m very upset. I was actually in tears earlier,” Tucker told KFOR. “I just want her to be able to graduate this year and get her education, that she deserves.”

The district said Bonacci will be allowed to return to school on Oct. 8.

Sources: KFOR, News 9 / Photo Credit: Screenshot from KFOR