Society

Doubt Cast On Al Sharpton's Daughter's Case (Photos)

| by Sheena Vasani
Dominique and Al SharptonDominique and Al Sharpton

The daughter of civil rights activist the Rev. Al Sharpton admitted she has gone dancing and hiking after spraining her ankle on New York sidewalk, for which she is suing the city.

Dominique Sharpton, 30, initially filed a $5 million lawsuit against New York City after she sprained her ankle in 2014 on an uneven sidewalk in Soho, causing "permanent pain and mental anguish," the Daily Mail reports.

She reportedly had to use crutches for a few weeks and underwent surgery and subsequent physiotherapy for ligament tears.

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Dominique, the membership director for her father's organization, National Action Network, said she was no longer able to run marathons, go skiing or wear high heels.

"It's really annoying," she said.

Dominique consequently sued and sought damages for "loss of quality of life, future pain and suffering, future medical bills, [and] future diminution of income."

To some, recent revelations have undermined her case.

She admitted that she did not immediately go to the hospital after she was injured. Instead, she went to her father's 60th birthday concert that day before seeking medical treatment, the New York Post reports.

Since then, she has gone traveling a dozen times, managed to hike a mountain in Bali and even go out dancing in heels.

Before filing the lawsuit in May 2015, social media photos reveal she had also just finished hiking near Las Vegas.

When asked by a lawyer if she was ever even a marathon runner, she replied, "Not necessarily. But if I, you know, if I needed to do it and exercising or something like that, I was capable of it. Now, I can't."

The multimillion dollar lawsuit may now only yield  $5,000 to $7,500 as her social media profiles reveal no evidence of "permanent" injury, according to a legal expert for the New York Post.

"Live your life off social media if you have a case," commented personal injury lawyer David Jaroslawicz.

"If she's going to claim she's disabled, the first thing you tell your client is, 'Don't live on social media,' because even if you don't lie, it makes you look bad."

Sources: Daily Mail and New York Post / Photo credit: Al Sharpton/Facebook, Wikimedia Commons, Google via Daily Mail, Instagram via Daily Mail, Facebook via Daily Mail 

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