Society

Reporter Confronts Woman Who He Says Used His Credit Card Information To Pay For Hotel Room (Video)

| by Jonathan Constante

A Fox 4 consumer reporter was notified that someone was trying to use his credit card to pay for a hotel room in North Texas. He decided to go to the hotel himself and confront the alleged credit card thief on camera (video below).

Steve Noviello had placed a fraud alert on his Visa account, which was bad news for Farah Parks.

Parks had reportedly checked into a room at the Hilton Garden Inn in Richardson, Texas. When the magnetic strip for her credit card wouldn’t swipe, she opted to enter the account number manually, Fox 4 reported.

But Parks reportedly did not enter her own credit number. Instead, she apparently entered Noviello’s credit card information.

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Only a few hours later, Noviello went to the Hilton Garden Inn and asked if anyone had checked in using his name. The clerk said no one had, but when he asked to run his credit card number against recent payments, it led him to Parks in room 239.

Noviello called the police and Parks was arrested. He went up to Parks’ floor while she was being detained and confronted her in a cellphone video. In the video, he asks her how she did it and why.

“I've just made some bad choices in my life,” Parks responds. “I’m aware of that and I apologize.”

Noviello accepts her apology and says he will visit her in jail to talk, but she declines his request for the interview. Noviello said he was hoping Parks would shed some light on how consumers could better protect their accounts.

Parks has yet to be convicted but has been charged with a crime.

According to business Insider, the EMV or “chip card,” which is standard in other countries, is a safer way to prevent credit card fraud. The chip cards are significantly more difficult to duplicate than the magnetic strip cards used in the U.S.

Photo credit: Screenshot from YouTube