Race

Arkansas Town Gets New Racist Welcome Sign To Go With White Supremacy Billboard

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht

An anonymous sponsor put up a racist welcome sign in Harrison, Ark., to accompany a white supremacy billboard that made headlines last fall.

The billboard shows a picture of a white heterosexual couple and their kids. It reads, “Welcome to Harrison: Beautiful Town, Beautiful People, No Wrong Exits, No Bad Neighborhoods.”

It appears just below a 2013 billboard that says, “Anti-Racist Is a Code Word for Anti-White.”

The billboard company will not disclose who is responsible for either sign, although the “anti-white” slogan is commonly used by the Ku Klux Klan and the white supremacy group the White Genocide Project.

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The new billboard is allegedly sponsored by a group called the Harrison Area Business Owners and promotes the Wordpress blog HarrisonArkansas.info.

The website says: “Many choose to live in Harrison because many things are in reach, but their day to day lives are lived in a setting that is traditionally small town Americana.”

It appears to be a normal tourism website, but it touts KKK director Thom Robb’s pro-white agenda as being “pro-American.”

Local realtor Bob Dodson told KY3 that he found a link to his business on the website.

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"I don't want to be associated with it," he said. "There are a few people who are trying to speak for the entire community and we have a loving community."

Dodson is working to get his link removed from the blog.

A member of the Community Task Force on Race Relations says the group or groups who put up the signs are promoting an anti-diversity agenda in Harrison.

"They're trying to stake their claim and build a community for themselves that they feel like they carry some weight in, and I think the community has had enough of that and saying they don't speak for them," said task force member Layne Ragsdale.

Sources: KATV, Arkansas Times, ky3.com