Society

Poll: Majority Of Americans Don't Like Trump Or Cruz

| by Robert Fowler
Ted Cruz and Donald TrumpTed Cruz and Donald Trump

Donald Trump and Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas are currently battling to win the GOP presidential nomination. Despite their front-runner statuses in the primary, new polling data indicates that whichever of the two wins, the Republican party loses come November.

On April 14, a joint Washington Post-ABC News poll was released, measuring the favorability of the remaining GOP presidential candidates. The results do not bode well for their general election prospects.

Surveying the general American public, the poll found that only 31 percent of respondents had a favorable opinion of Trump. A staggering 67 percent viewed the business mogul unfavorably.

Cruz fared only marginally better. The senator scored a 36 percent favorable rating, while 53 percent of respondents took an unfavorable view.

The only candidate who broke even was Republican Gov. John Kasich of Ohio, who scored a 39 percent favorable rating and a 39 percent unfavorable rating. Despite these relatively better numbers, the governor has won only one state contest during the GOP primary so far, his home state of Ohio.

Other surveys have come to the same conclusion that Kasich is the only viable GOP candidate for the general election, despite being roundly rejected by the party electorate.

On April 13, media firm Morning Consult released a study projecting the electoral outcome of the general election using different scenarios, The Atlantic reports.

If the election were held in April, the study predicted that Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton would decimate Donald Trump. The former Secretary of State would win 328 electoral votes, while the business mogul would take only 210.

If Clinton were matched against Cruz, she would receive an even larger electoral vote haul with 332, while the Texas senator would collect 206. The study found that only Kasich could defeat Clinton, the governor winning 304 electoral votes, leaving Clinton with just 234.

Clinton is still competing with Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont in the Democratic primary, but the former Secretary of State is still considered the front-runner for the nomination.

Despite her projected general election strength, Clinton herself has low approval ratings. According to The Hill, the Huffpost Pollster, which averages findings from 42 different polling organizations, listed her favorability to be 40 percent, while 55 percent of Americans view her unfavorably.

Those numbers are still not as dire as the popularity deficit Trump and Cruz have.

“It’s like that story of two guys running from a bear,” Democratic strategist Brad Bannon told The Hill. “One says, ‘We better run real fast,’ and the other says, ‘I don’t have to run faster than the bear. I only have to run faster than you.’”

Bannon concluded, “Hillary Clinton doesn’t have to be great. She just has to be better than Donald Trump or Ted Cruz.”

Sources: The Atlantic, The Hill, The Washington Post / Photo credit: Gage Skidmore / Flickr (2)

Could either Donald Trump or Ted Cruz win the general election?
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