Pilot Allegedly Threw Woman Off Flight For Tweeting About His Sobriety Test

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht

A JetBlue pilot allegedly threw a passenger off her flight Tuesday after she tweeted something about him.

Lisa Carter-Knight says she wasn’t allowed to board her flight from Philadelphia to Boston Tuesday night because she tweeted about the fact that her flight was delayed as the pilot underwent a sobriety test.

“JetBlue has denied me service at all on any flight back to Boston because a pilot made a decision that my social media interaction with my friends and family was not appropriate and was not going to be tolerated by him,” wrote Knight. “So, I was thrown off the flight tonight.”

Carter-Knight’s flight was delayed at 9 p.m. and she tweeted photos of the plane.

Philyflight760. Still grounded as authorities board plane for pilot sobriety test

— Lisa Carter-Knight (@drinkwaterevent) October 8, 2014

Carter-Knight said an angry passenger waited on the jetway when the pilot came out and told them he had been accused of drinking and that everyone would have to go back to the gate while he underwent a sobriety test.

"As a precautionary measure, a sobriety test was conducted," JetBlue said in a statement. "The test demonstrated the pilot was sober and he was cleared to perform his duties.”

When the pilot was given the all-clear, she says she wasn’t allowed onto the plane.

“I was just doing what I normally do with my kids, sharing information with my friends that I was frustrated that I was sitting there without a flight home and I miss my children,” she told CBS Philly.

“Now I’m here at one o’clock in the morning with my mother, who had surgery this weekend, to pick me up because a JetBlue pilot made a decision to kick me off his flight,” she added.

JetBlue says it will investigate why she was kicked off the flight, Daily Mail reported. They released this statement to CBS Philly:

“It is not our practice to remove a customer for expressing criticism of their experience in any medium. We will remove a customer if they are disruptive and the crew evaluates that there is a risk of escalation which could lead to an unsafe environment. The decision to remove a customer from a flight is not taken lightly. If we feel a customer is not complying with safety instructions, exhibits objectionable behavior or causes conflict at the gate or on the aircraft, the customer will be asked to deplane or will be denied boarding especially if the crew feels the situation runs the risk of accelerating in the air.

In this instance, the customer received a refund and chose to fly on another carrier.”


Sources: CBS Philly, Daily Mail

Image credit: Flickr Creative Commons / Peter Dutton, CBS Philadelphia