Photo Of Egalitarian Instructions From 1970s Lego Set Goes Viral

| by Dominic Kelly

A photo of a 1970s note to parents from what is claimed to be a Lego set has gone viral because of its progressive, egalitarian message, but many are wondering whether or not the note is legitimate.

The letter to parents from the Lego set that’s claimed to be straight out of the 1970s reads in part, “A lot of boys like dolls houses. They’re more human than spaceships. A lot of girls prefer spaceships. They’re more exciting than dolls houses. The most important thing is to put the right materials in their hands and let them create whatever appeals to them.”

Reddit user fryd_ posted the image this week and it quickly went viral, and although some have questioned the legitimacy of the note, io9 points out that there’s no reason to believe the note isn’t real.

“So – is it a fake? Probably not! For one thing, the logo in the note is the one you would expect to find in a Lego pamphlet from the seventies, and is subtly but noticeably different from the more modern Lego logo, which was updated in 1998,” writes io9 reporter Robbie Gonzalez in his analysis.

Reports also note that the same set of instructions to parents were printed in the German version of the Lego set in the 1970s and has already been posted online.

The Reddit user responsible for the photo says he is shocked by all the attention the photo has received and wishes he could provide more information.

“I had no idea this would blow up so much, so didn't take more photos but this was at my partner's Grandma's house, on the back page of a pamphlet that came with a set from 73 she still has,” the user wrote. “There was a blonde girl on the front with a white Lego house. Sorry I don't have more info.”

Many point out that if the instructions are in fact real, they highlight the sad fact that Lego has clearly shifted to gender-specific toys since these were first printed.

Do you think this set of egalitarian Lego instructions is real?

Sources: BoingBoing, Metro UK, io9 / Photo Source: Flickr