Society

Boy Has Days To Live After Parents Stop Chemotherapy

| by Sean Kelly

A 6-year-old boy in Perth, Australia, is confined to a bed with days to live after his parents fought and won a court battle to end his cancer treatment.

Doctors diagnosed Oshin Kiszko with brain cancer in November 2015. His parents were vehemently opposed to the radiation treatment ordered by the hospital, but Oshin was ultimately given court-ordered chemotherapy for his illness, the Daily Mail reports.

"He's actually very peaceful, very loving, very kind, he’s been the most beautiful boy, touching people's hearts, telling them they're amazing, telling them he loves them," Oshin's mother, Angela Kiszko, told Perth Now. "[Care provider] Silver Chain have told me he only had a couple of days left but that was over a week ago. So he just keeps surprising us."

The boy's parents went to court to oppose the treatment plan ordered by doctors because of a major risk of brain damage. Oshin eventually ended all treatment at his parents' wishes, and instead began the journey towards the end of his life.

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"I’m assuming a lot of people will say, 'I bet you regret your decision now,' but I don’t because my decision was purely in his best interests, not mine," Kiszko said. "Originally I asked for chemo only and they wouldn’t give it to him unless he had radiation as well. Oshin was such an athletic boy, so to be reduced to a life of being in a chair and having brain damage, he wouldn’t have been able to cope. It would have been hell for him."

In his final days, the boy reportedly had a powerful and emotional message for his parents.

"All the love in my heart is in your heart and all the love in your heart is in everyone's heart," he told his mother. "Your heart won’t ever be broken. I will protect you."

Sources: Perth Now, Daily Mail / Photo credit: Oceans of Hope/Facebook via Daily Mail

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