Society

Parents Of Boy In Harambe's Pit Request Zoo Donations

| by Michael Howard
Michelle Gregg, Deonne Dickerson and familyMichelle Gregg, Deonne Dickerson and family

The parents of the boy who fell into the gorilla exhibit at the Cincinnati Zoo on May 28 have confirmed their son is doing well and that, while they have received harsh criticism for not keeping close enough watch on their child, they have also received a lot of support.

In a statement released June 1, Michelle Gregg and Deonne Dickerson once again thanked the Cincinnati Zoo for saving their son and also revealed that a number of individuals have offered them money, which they declined.

Instead, they would like that money to be sent to the Cincinnati Zoo to commemorate Harambe, the 17-year-old endangered gorilla that was shot and killed by zoo authorities to rescue Gregg and Dickerson's child.

"We are also very appreciative for the expressions of concern and support that have been sent to us," they wrote, according to the Daily Mail. "Some have offered money to the family, which we do not want and will not accept. If anyone wishes to make a gift, we recommend a donation to the Cincinnati Zoo in Harambe's name."

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Meanwhile the Cincinnati Police Department has confirmed an investigation into Gregg's role in the incident is underway.

"The investigation is regarding the action of parents and family that led up to the incident and is not related to zoo operations," Cincinnati Police Department spokesperson Tiffaney Hardy told the New York Post. "We're looking into the incidents that led up the incident."

Prosecutor Joseph T. Deters released a statement in which he said that criminal charges could be forthcoming.

"Once [the police department's] investigation is concluded, they will confer with our office on possible criminal charges," he wrote. "When the investigation and review are complete, we will update the media."

Shortly after the incident occurred, Gregg took to Facebook to push back against accusations that her negligence created a situation in which zookeepers had no choice but to shoot and kill the gorilla.

"As a society we are quick to judge how a parent could take their eyes off of their child and if anyone knows me [they know] I keep a tight watch on my kids," she wrote. "Accidents happen but I am thankful that the right people were in the right place today."

Sources: Daily Mail, New York Post / Photo credit: Michelle Gregg/Facebook via Daily Mail

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