Society

Only 4 In 10 Americans Know About the Incandescent Light Bulb Phase-Out

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Beginning Jan. 1, 40-watt and 60-watt incandescent bulbs, the most popular light bulbs in the United States, will cease to exist.

This is brand new news to many, even though it shouldn’t be. A “Socket Survey revealed only 40 percent of the population are aware of this final phase-out, or 4 in 10 Americans," the Huffington Post reports.

Osram Sylvania released the 2013 edition of its Socket Survey, known as the “only nationwide measure of public attitudes about energy-efficient lighting and awareness of lighting legislation.”

This is the final phase-out stage of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The 40 and 60-watt incandescent bulbs will follow suit with the 75-watt and 100-watt bulbs that were phased out over the last couple of years.

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While these bulbs will still be available on store shelves, retailers won’t be able to re-stock them once they are sold out because they did not meet the new federal efficiency standards that were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy in 2007.

Instead, consumers will have three choices: more efficient incandescent bulbs that look about the same as the old fashioned bulbs, fluorescent bulbs or CFLs, and electronic bulbs known as LEDs, according to Cleveland.com

Although the survey found most people are not aware of the changes soon to take effect, almost 60 percent of those who are aware are looking forward to the phase-out because the new bulbs use less electricity.

The survey also found that brightness, life span, energy consumption and price were the biggest concerns of consumers who will be switching form incandescent for new bulbs.

As for the 30 percent of respondents who said they own LEDs, only 11 percent of them actually own LEDs that can be screwed into standard lamp and household fixtures.

Sources: Huffington Post, Cleveland.com