Society

Officers Who Shot Innocent Women During Christopher Dorner Manhunt Won't Be Charged

| by Reve Fisher
The blue pickup truck matching the description of Dorner's is seen with bullet holes in it behind a patrol car The blue pickup truck matching the description of Dorner's is seen with bullet holes in it behind a patrol car

No charges will be filed against the eight LAPD officers who opened fire on two innocent women during the manhunt for Christopher Dorner in 2013.

The Los Angeles County district attorney’s office announced its decision on Jan. 27, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Dorner, a former cop, had posted an online manifesto in which he sought vengeance against the police officers he blamed for his firing.

On Feb. 7, 2013, a pickup truck that allegedly matched Dorner’s vehicle description drove near an area in which one of the targeted officers lived. 

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A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

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According to KABC, the officers shot over 100 rounds at the truck, the occupants of which turned to be newspaper delivery women, Margie Carranza and her mother, Emma Hernandez.

“The people in the truck were the wrong race, the wrong gender,” the women's attorney, Glenn Jonas, said, according to KABC. “The truck was the wrong make, the wrong model, and the wrong color.”

Hernandez was shot twice in the back, while her daughter suffered injuries to her hand.

The City of Los Angeles ultimately reached a $4.2 million settlement with the women.

"I absolutely believe that the officers involved in this shooting were truthful about what they felt, truthful about what they believed that they saw," Police Chief Charlie Beck said, "but I also think that some of the things that they perceived were unreasonable in the application as it goes to a reasonable officer."

According to an internal investigation, the officers violated department policy. However, prosecutors cited a lack of evidence that they were not acting in self-defense.

Jonas stated that the 52-page memo did not offer enough information for him to assess whether the officers should be prosecuted.

“What it doesn’t tell us is who took the first shot and why,” Jonas said. “And that’s really the most important question.”

"The department pushed ill-prepared officers out there," attorney Gary Fullerton said, according to the Los Angeles Times.

"I don’t think the department is taking responsibility for their share of why this thing happened and what they’re going to do about it in the future," he added.

Although Hernandez is OK with the decision, her daughter wanted the officers to be charged, according to their attorney.

“It’s a tough situation," Jonas said. "But we have an opportunity here to learn, and I don’t feel like we did.”

Sources: Los Angeles Times, KABC / Photo Credit: KABC

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