Society

NRA Turns Children's Games Into Gun Targets

| by Michael Allen

The National Rifle Association posted some printable PDF targets on its blog on Nov. 2 that are based on children's games.

One target takes the kid's game "Candy Land" and calls it "Target Land." Other printable targets include "Battleship" and "Checkers."

The NRA writes: "Board games are a great way to bond with friends and family. But have these timeless games you’ve grown up with, played time and time again, become a little, well, boring? Put a twist on your favorite games and head to the range!"

Gersh Kuntzman of the New York Daily News fired back:

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This young teenage singer was shocked when Keith Urban invited her on stage at his concert. A few moments later, he made her wildest dreams come true.

Guns are weapons of war and violence. Yes, they are used for hunting and target games, but the vast majority of the world’s weapons are fired in anger or to threaten, as an act of violence, to kill another life form or to pulverize something inanimate. Guns make us feel powerful. And the more accepted they are in the discourse, the less discourse there can be about them (as my hate mail proves!).

Of course, the vast majority of gun owners are responsible citizens who wouldn’t hurt a living thing. But they’re also adults, whose personalities have fully formed.

Kids are impressionable. Encouraging them to fire weapons by equating the act to one of their favorite board games suggest that guns are themselves a game — a lesson that could have disastrous ramifications.

Guns, after all, are not playthings. We can all agree to that, which is why responsible owners secure them properly — in locked cabinets, not in an open toy chest.

Popular Video

This young teenage singer was shocked when Keith Urban invited her on stage at his concert. A few moments later, he made her wildest dreams come true:

Make no mistake: I don’t love "Candy Land." I’ve long hated its worldview and also question why King Candy won’t step down from the throne so that long-suffering Princess Frostine can finally marry Mr. Mint and move into the Candy Castle. And part of me wishes it had a Donald Trump-esque figure to drain the Chocolate Swamp and forever banish the menacing Gloppy.

But it’s still just a game, not a gun.

Sources: NRA Blog, New York Daily News / Photo credit: NRA Blog

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