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Neil Armstrong's Accent May be Reason for Famous Misquote

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Neil Armstrong has repeatedly insisted that his famous statement from the moon is misquoted, as people believe he said "for man" instead of "for a man."

When listening to the recording, it sounds as if he said "that's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind," but Armstrong claims he said "a" before "man."

Many have blamed poor recording equipment for the miss quote, but speech scientists recently revealed it may have more to do with his Ohio accent.

The research team at Michigan State University and Ohio State University analyzed the clip of Armstrong's quote and compared it to how native central Ohio residents pronounce "for" and "for a."

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They found that many Ohioans blend the word "for" with "a" when it is placed immediately afterward.

This means Armstrong really could have said "for a man," though most of all who listen to the statement believe it is "for man."

Dr. Laura Dilley of Michigan State said, "Prior acoustic analyses of Neil Armstrong's recording have established well that if the word "a" was spoken, it was very short and fully blended acoustically with the preceding word. If Armstrong actually did say "a", it sounded something like "frrr(uh)." His blending of the two words, compounded with the poor sound quality of the transmission, has made it difficult for people to corroborate his claim that the "a" is there."

Dilley said she feels they have "partially vindicated" Armstrong.

"But we'll most likely never know for sure exactly what he said based on the acoustic information."

She plans to present her findings with her research team at the 21st International Congress on Acoustics in Montreal.

Her team isn't the only one to find that Armstrong might have actually said "a," as computer analysis also found this probable.

Peter Shann Ford, an Australian computer programmer, ran a software analysis that looked for sound waves and found one wave that could have been the missing "a." It lasted only 35 milliseconds and was too fast to be heard.

Sources: Daily Mail, FOX