Society

NAACP And KKK Meet In Wyoming To Discuss Violence Against Black Men

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Two local organizations in Wyoming got together to discuss some happenings in the community of Casper. Normally this wouldn’t be news except the two organizations were the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the Ku Klux Klan.

Jimmy Simmons, the president of the local NAACP branch, reached out to KKK organizer John Abarr because he wanted to discuss several instances of black men being beat up in nearby Gillette, Wyo. Surprisingly, Abarr accepted Simmons’ invitation to meet.

Simmons had apparently first considered rallying against the KKK after Klan literature began showing up around town, but decided to try a different approach.

During the meeting, Abarr revealed that he is a member of the ACLU and the Southern Poverty Law Center. However he also argued for segregation and said that white police should remain in white neighborhoods and black cops in black neighborhoods, The Blaze reported. Abarr also spoke against interracial marriage, “because we want white babies.”

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He defended the KKK literature as nothing but a public service.

“I like it because you wear robes, and get out and light crosses, and have secret handshakes,” he said. “I like being in the Klan — I sort of like it that people think I’m some sort of outlaw.”

NAACP member Mel Hamilton, criticized Abarr for not knowing the vile history of the KKK.

“It’s obvious you don’t know the history of your organization,” said Hamilton. “It’s obvious to me that you’re not going out and talking about the good — you’re not talking about inclusion, you’re talking about exclusion. And it’s obvious to me you don’t know what you are.”

Abarr reportedly filled out an application to join the NAACP at the end of the meeting. He added a $20 donation on top of the $30 membership fee.

Sources: The Blaze, The Casper Star-Tribune