Society

Mother Who Lost Son To Heroin Stunned By Response From Clothing Company

| by Amanda Andrade-Rhoades

In 2010, Patty DiRenzo’s son Sal died of a heroin overdose. Since then, she’s been a strong voice in the midst of New Jersey’s heroin crisis, but she was met with anger and outrage when she attacked Urban Stash Spot Clothing, a California-based company.

Many items of clothing created by Urban Stash Spot feature logos and graphics related to drug use, My Fox Philly reported. DiRenzo decided to email the company.

"Explain to me how glamorizing drugs on clothes is good???" she wrote. "I lost my son to drugs and do not understand why you would create clothing that glamorizes them -- I will be reaching out to my support groups through social media to fight against your clothing.

The same day, three emails that allegedly originated from employees at the company were sent in reply to DiRenzo. The first email read: “Buy B**ch help your kid out next time.”

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

Popular Video

A police officer saw a young black couple drive by and pulled them over. What he did next left them stunned:

The second email was also contained expletives: "#UrbanGangB**ch, don't be mad at Fields cause ur son made stupid decisions 100.”

The final email read:  "No one gives a f*** how you lost your son, F*** YOUR SON. I'd kill em myself if he was alive still lol jk you f***ing petty bitch...post this too you f***ing lowlife. You still won't do a damn thing and you aren't going to change shit! You're as insignificant as a grain of sand so just wash away." 

DiRenzo was stunned by the response. "It was upsetting, I was hurt. I was, literally hurt, I mean, I didn't know what to do. I was so dumbfounded because I could not believe that a business would operate this way," she said. 

A company representative did not address the emails in a statement to NJ.com. “We are not drug dealers. We sell clothes with drugs on there. I can't help that people's kids do drugs. Go get at the drug dealers, not the people that teach kids how to sell clothes with drugs on it instead of the real stuff,"  they said. 

A separate response was also sent to My Fox Philly, claiming they don’t teach children to try drugs and that their wares are just clothing, nothing more.

Sources: NJ.com, My Fox Philly Image via Urban Stash Spot Clothing