Society

Mother Of Charlottesville Victim Refuses To Meet Trump

| by Robert Fowler

Susan Bro, mother of the slain Heather Heyer, 32, refuses to ever meet with President Donald Trump and accused him of besmirching her daughter's name when he asserted that white nationalists and anti-racist protesters were equally to blame for violence during the alt-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

On Aug. 17, Bro disclosed that she had not responded to several White House entreaties to speak with Trump in the wake of Heyer's murder.

"I saw that his office had called about three times..." Bro told MSNBC. "...It feels awful, but I just haven't had time to talk to the president."

The mourning mother also disclosed that she had received death threats for vocalizing her opposition to racism since her daughter's death.

On Aug. 12, Heyer was killed and 19 others were injured when alt-right member James Alex Fields Jr. allegedly plowed his vehicle through a crowd during a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville. Heyer was among the anti-racist counter protesters who had demonstrated against the white nationalists.

On Aug. 16, Bro vowed that Heyer's activism would live on during a memorial service in Charlottesville.

"They tried to kill my child to shut her up, but guess what, you just magnified her," Bro said, according to The Washington Post.

Bro added that she would take up her daughter's cause and speak out for racial justice on the national stage, concluding, "I'd rather have my child, but by golly if I got to give her up, we're going to make it count."

On Aug. 18, Bro revealed that not only had she not spoken with Trump, but also that she would refuse to speak to him after his remarks about Charlottesville.

"I hadn't really watched the news until last night and I'm not talking to the president now, I'm sorry, after what he said about my child," Bro told ABC News' "Good Morning America."

"It's not that I saw somebody else's tweets about him, I saw an actual clip of him at a press conference equating the protesters ... with the KKK and the white supremacists," Bro continued.

On Aug. 15, Trump asserted that the anti-racist protesters in Charlottesville were just as culpable for violence as the white nationalists.

"You had a group on one side that was bad and you had a group on the other side that was also very violent," Trump said, according to CNBC. "And nobody wants to say that, but I'll say it right now... I do think there's blame on both sides."

The president added that he had condemned white nationalism the day before on Aug. 14, and asserted that Bro wrote him and said "the nicest things," and he "very much appreciated that."

In Bro's view, Trump's remarks equated her daughter and fellow anti-racist protesters with the white nationalists. The mourning mother added that she would refuse any apologies from the president.

"You can't wash this one away by shaking my hand and saying, 'I'm sorry,'" Bro said. "I'm not forgiving for that."

Bro concluded that if she hypothetically met with Trump, then she would tell him, "Think before you speak."

When asked to respond to Bro's comments on Aug. 18, White House Press Secretary Lindsay Walters stated, "Our thoughts and prayers continue to be with her and her family."

Sources: ABC NewsCNBCMSNBCThe Washington Post  / Featured Image: Gage Skidmore/Flickr / Embedded Images: Ted Eytan/Flickr, Gage Skidmore/Flickr

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