Society

Michelle Obama’s Healthy Lunch Regulations Cost Indiana School District $300K

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Officials from an Indiana school district say the new healthy menu changes brought on by first lady Michelle Obama’s federal lunch regulations cost them $300,000 in the past school year. Apparently students in Carmel Clay, Ind., do not want to eat healthy.

 “I’m a registered dietitian," said Amy Anderson, the food service director for the school district. "I used to feel that I was an educator and part of the education system. I currently feel like I’m a food cop. I don’t get credit for the 98 percent of our kids who are within normal weight range. I only get slammed for the 2 to 3 percent who aren’t.” Anderson says that the menu changes might “drive her into retirement.”

“I’ve got kids who can stop at Panera and pick up a sandwich that meets none of these criteria," Anderson said. "I’m not maybe your typical school district, and they’re assuming that every student doesn’t have access to food, and that’s incorrect in this community. Our kids can just wait and just hop in their BMWs and go to McDonald’s, which they’re rebuilding, making it bigger.”

Anderson is not the only one who has a problem with the new menu, The Washington Times reported.

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“I’ve had a lot of complaints, especially with the little guys,” said food service director Linda Wireman. “They get a three-quarters cup of vegetables, but if it’s something they don’t like, it goes down the garbage disposal. So there are a lot of complaints they’re going home hungry.”

Another food service director, Lori Shofroth, affirmed that much of the food ends up getting thrown away.

“They’re teaching our kids with this meal pattern that it’s OK to throw away,” she said. “We did a waste study on three different schools, and there was a huge amount of waste. That was just with produce, fruit or vegetables or milk.”

Even so, the program might be a good idea. Fifteen percent of Indiana high school seniors were obese in 2011, one of the highest rates in the United States.

Sources: The Washington Times, EAGnews