Society

Man Saves Woman's Life With AED, Called 'Pervert' For Removing Her Clothes To Apply Electrode Pads

| by Emily Smith

A man in Japan said he was grilled by police and called a “pervert” after he cut through a woman’s clothing to apply a defibrillator to her bare chest.

In a series of Twitter posts earlier this month, the unnamed man described the incident. Upon discovering the scene of a traffic accident, the man found a female passenger to be unconscious and without a pulse. The man began to administer artificial respiration and CPR. He also called emergency services.

When an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) -- a device that administers electric shock to a person suffering cardiac arrest -- was procured from a convenience store, the man began to cut the women’s clothing open and administer the AED.

As the man cut through the fabric and applied the AED, which requires direct contact with the skin, the driver of the vehicle immediately asked what he was doing and called the man a “pervert.” The driver went on to report the man as a sexual molester to the police.

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When police arrived at the scene, the injured parties were taken to the hospital, and the man who administered the AED was questioned by the police. Once the man noted that he had used the scissors, which were provided in the AED kit, to cut through the woman’s clothes and administer the device he was released without further questioning.

“An AED is supposed to be applied directly to the skin. Because the electric current it produces is strong, the underwire of a bra could prove extremely dangerous,” the man wrote on Twitter. “Please remember this.”

The man was later informed that his actions had saved the female passenger’s life. Although the man was offered a certificate of appreciation, he declined it.

AEDs are generally provided in public spaces like shopping centers, schools and sports facilities. They are designed to be used by members of the public who may not have received any formal training with the device.

Sources: Japan Today, Rocket News