Society

McDonald's Serves Man A Half-Eaten Biscuit

| by Jonathan Wolfe

McDonald’s makes dirt cheap food. We all know that. You don’t pull into a McDonald’s drive-through expecting to get a delicately cooked burger or an artisan batch of fries. What you should expect, though, is food that hasn’t been half-eaten by someone else.

Mississippi man Don Richardson ordered a McDonald’s sausage biscuit recently on his way to a Mississippi State football game. He was hoping to get a quick bite in before kickoff. When he unwrapped his food, he found nothing resembling a sausage biscuit – or even a whole biscuit. He’d been served a half-eaten jelly biscuit.

"I was driving, hurrying to get to an 11 (a.m.) game and nearly bit into it before I looked down and saw it,” Richardson told the Clarion Ledger. "[My wife] wanted me to take it back then, but we were already several miles down the road by then and didn't want to miss kickoff."

Here’s what he was served:                                             

                               

Richardson returned to the McDonald’s a few days later and reported the botched order, but management at the restaurant didn’t seem to care.

"I still haven't gotten as much as a 'We're sorry this happened' or 'We'll check the videotape and see how this happened,’” Richardson says. “They act like they don't care that I received an order that somebody else — I'm assuming one of their employees — had been eating."

The Clarion Ledger reports that Richardson was eventually given a phone number for My Joy Inc., the company that handles customer service complaints for this McDonald’s location.

“I got a real nice woman on the phone, who referred me to their customer service person," Richardson said. "When I called him, he did listen to me and told me that 'possibly one of our employees failed.' But then he added, 'If what you say is true,' which totally ticked me off. I wouldn't be spending this much time on a sausage biscuit that cost $1.08 if it wasn't true.”

Richardson just wants an acknowledgement and an apology.

"I'm not out to get McDonald's, I'm not out to sue them,” he said. “But I would like an apology. And I would like for them to care enough to go back and look at the videotape and try to find out how it happened so that it doesn't happen to somebody else. And then call me and tell me what happened. They have my number."

Source: The Clarion Ledger