Religion

Louisiana Teachers Can Continue To Teach Creationism

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Creationism will be staying in the classrooms of Louisiana, for now at least. An attempt to repeal legislation that permits teachers to bring creationist textbooks into the classroom was defeated by a 3-2 vote.

The effort to eliminate the Louisiana Science Education Act was started by teenage activist Zack Kopplin. Sen. Karen Carter Peterson was also involved in the attempted repeal. Kopplin previously launched legal bids to repeal the Science Education Act in 2011 and 2012.

Kopplin is not giving up.

“For the past few months we’ve been organizing relentlessly and having people contact their elected officials to ask them to vote to repeal Louisiana’s creationism law,” Kopplin said.

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“We lost again this year, but we’re making progress. We gained a second vote. And on top of this, it was clear that we will eventually win and repeal this vote. It’s up to the legislators to choose which side of history they want to stand on.”

Sen. Elbert Guillory had reservations about repealing the act. He said that eliminating it could “lock the door on being able to view ideas from many places, concepts from many cultures.” Part of the reason he opposed repealing the law was because of an experience he had with a spiritual healer, the Inquisitr reported.

“Yet if I closed my mind when I saw this man – in the dust, throwing some bones on the ground, semi-clothed – if I had closed him off and just said, ‘That’s not science. I’m not going to see this doctor,’ I would have shut off a very good experience for myself,” Guillory said.

The Louisiana Science Education Act certainly has its fair share of detractors, though.

"The LSE Act is a bad law, not because of its spirit, but because of its failure to provide the necessary restrictions, standards, and guidelines required in order for the original intent to be successfully realized," said Tammy Wood, a teacher who won the 1991 Louisiana Presidential Award for science education.

Sources: Inquisitr, The Times Picayune