Society

L.A. Public Schools Discover Evidence Of Porn Shoot, Suspend Commercial Filming Requests

| by Nicholas Roberts

The Los Angeles Unified School District temporarily suspended all commercial filming on its campuses on Oct. 9, after it was discovered a pornographic film was shot at a high school in 2011, reports the Los Angeles Times.

The district has long allowed film production companies on its campuses as a source of revenue, especially for campuses with the classic high-school look, such as Alexander Hamilton High School or John Marshall High School, both in Los Angeles. According to a broadcast report by KNBC-TV Channel 4, the pornographic film was shot at Hamilton High.

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Filming permits and district records show the 2012 film “Revenge of the Petites” was filmed on Hamilton High's campus, after show producers paid cash to film there on two consecutive Saturdays in October 2011, according to NBC4. The film also apparently featured public nudity in the school's front parking lot.

LAUSD Superintendent Ramon Cortines issued a statement on Oct. 9 saying the district will temporarily suspend all pending filming requests on the campus, and that future requests will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, reports Variety.

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“It is important that we ensure teaching and learning are not disrupted, and that all filming activity is appropriate for our schools,” Cortines' statement on the FilmL.A. website reads. FilmL.A. is the organization that contracts with LAUSD to arrange permits for filming.

NBC4 also found that schools within the district were often willing to accept extra donations to allow production companies to skirt rules regarding school disruptions. This often led to an environment of frequent class interruptions and frustration on the part of students and teachers. NBC4 reports the school district made around $10 million from film permits over the past five years.

LAUSD spokeswoman Shannon Haber sent an email to NBC4 on Oct. 8 about the porn shoot"

"The district was made aware at that time that the production company failed to comply with terms of the filming agreement. We immediately notified the production company that it was banned from ever using district facilities again. We also demanded that the company remove any and all images depicting the school or its students from the film."

Sources: Los Angeles Times, NBC4, Variety / Photo credit: WorldWide Weird News