Stalin's Granddaughter Is A Tattooed Portland Resident

| by Jordan Smith
Chrese EvansChrese Evans

Chrese Evans, the granddaughter of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin is as “American as apple pie,” according to her mother.

Evans is a fan of tattoos who now lives in Portland, Oregon, the Daily Mail reports.

She runs her own business and recently posted images of her tattoos to her social media account.

“This one took a few years but it was completed in 2007,” Evans wrote of one, according to the Mail.

The 44-year-old, who was born Olga but decided to change her name, was educated in Britain after her mother, Svetlana Alliluyeva, fled the Soviet Union in the 1960s.

“My mother's whole life has been about living this [her association with Stalin] down and trying to lead a new life of her own,” Evans told the Mail in 2011.

“Of course, she abhors what Stalin did,” she added.

“But there was a period when so many people held her responsible for his actions that she actually started to think maybe it was true. It's so unjust."

Alliluyeva died in 2011 from colon cancer. She was 85 years old at the time.

Stalin seized power in the Soviet Union in the 1920s and was responsible for the deaths of millions during his rule, which lasted until his death in 1953.

Between 1936 and 1938, he directed the Moscow trials, which resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Communist Party members, including many leading figures of the Russian revolution in 1917, according to Spiked. Critics of Stalin’s policies in the Left Opposition were killed and the communist youth movement was purged.

Evans’ life is far removed from her mother’s early years growing up in the Kremlin, the Daily Mail notes.

Alliluyeva was introduced to Winston Churchill when the British Prime Minister visited her father during World War II.

“I don't forgive anybody anything," Alliluyeva said as an old woman. "If [Stalin] could kill so many people, I could never forgive him."

Evans said her mother had an influence on her.

“She had incredible faith,” Evans told PBS in 2015, according to the Mail. “And I didn't really develop that sense of faith until actually after she passed away and that sense of her being with me.”

"She always called me American as apple pie," Evans added.

Sources: Daily Mail, Spiked / Photo Credit: Chrese Evans/Facebook via Daily Mail

Do you think it is fair to be criticized for the actions of relatives?
Yes - 0%
Yes - 0%