Report: 'Jack The Ripper' Identity Finally Revealed

| by Sean Kelly
Jack The RipperJack The Ripper

The identity of Jack the Ripper has reportedly been discovered following an investigation and the upcoming exhumation of his final victim.

The British Ministry of Justice announced it will grant an exhumation license for the grave of one of Jack the Ripper’s victims. The great-nephew of Mary Jane Kelly, Dr. Wynne Weston-Davis, provided evidence to the ministry that Kelly’s husband was, in fact, the legendary Victorian-era London serial killer. The husband’s name was Francis Spurzheim Craig. 

“The only way of absolutely proving that the Ripper’s final victim was my great aunt is to exhume Mary Jane Kelly’s body,” Weston-Davies, a former surgeon, told The Telegraph. “We will then attempt to extract DNA from her bones or teeth and compare them with DNA from myself or my brother who, as far as I know, are her only living relatives.”

Weston-Davies said he began researching his family history and the connection to Jack the Ripper a decade ago. He wrote a book, which is being published in serial form in The Telegraph.

“I didn’t know more than the average person about Jack the Ripper when I started out researching my family history more than 10 years ago,” he said. “My father, who died in 1996, always refused to speak about his family, saying they were a 'bad lot.' One day in 2011, I was at the National Archives looking for documents and keyed the surname Weston Davies into their database, and one result that popped up was Weston Jones. I was about to disregard it but ordered the document out of curiosity."

He added, “When it arrived it consisted of a box of legal documents including a divorce petition and an affidavit. They related to my ancestor who had adopted a false surname -- the ‘Weston Jones’ name -- to pose as a widow when she wed, which was common at the time because although she’d never been married she was sexually experienced. An extraordinary story started to unfold about a woman marrying a man much older than herself, Francis Craig, and how this a marriage only lasted a few months, and then turned sour.”

Weston-Davies said it was a few more years before he finally made the connection between Francis Craig and Jack the Ripper.

“I ordered Francis Craig’s death certificate and then tracked down reports of the inquest into his death,” he said. “It was another bombshell. I realized he had committed suicide by slitting his own throat with a blade, exactly the same way the Ripper’s victims had been murdered.”

Jack the Ripper’s identity was also recently believed to have been identified as Aaron Kosminski, a Polish immigrant who lived in London's East End at the time of the murders. The reported identity was discovered via DNA evidence by molecular biologist Dr. Jari Louhelainen, Seeker reported.

Sources: The Telegraph, Seeker / Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

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