Iranian Prince On Food Stamps Investigated For Welfare Fraud

| by David Bonner
Ali Pascal Mahvi posing with painting of his fatherAli Pascal Mahvi posing with painting of his father

Ohio resident Ali Pascal Mahvi was born the son of an Iranian prince, but he was on American welfare for two years.

Despite owning an 8,000-square-foot home, horses, fancy sports cars, a yacht and various international properties, his family received about $300 a month in food stamps, reports KVUE.

In Sept. 2016, police raided Mahvi's residence, taking computers and boxes of documents, reports the Daily Beast.

"It's outrageous to see a situation where somebody is living in a house almost worth a million dollars, a horse barn, driving luxury cars, have millions of dollars in overseas bank accounts and here they are accepting this type of assistance,” Geauga County prosecutor James R. Flaiz told WKYC. “Certainly, they were very good at manipulating the system,” he added.

Authorities are examining finances to see if he is guilty of welfare fraud. They say he has at least 14 bank accounts containing a total of $4.2 million.

However, Mahvi claims to be broke, and that only loans from friends are enabling his family to continue living a life of luxury. He qualifies for food stamps, he says, because loans from friends are not considered income, although it covers his $4,600 mortgage, car insurance, pet food for seven dogs, two cats, two horses and $500 cellphone bills.

Mahvi is the author of a memoir called "The Deadly Secrets of Iranian Princes." His father was a chief adviser to the Shah of Iran, and his family was forced to flee the country after the 1979 Iranian Revolution, which brought the Ayatollah Khomeini to power.

Mahvi writes that he was on the new regime’s death list because he had been engaged to a Playboy bunny. “The clergy there put a fatwa on me to have me killed,” he said.

After emigrating to the United States, Mahvi met the daughter of a Cleveland police chief, and married her instead of the Playboy bunny.

Summing up his current situation, Mahvi says: “I am a real prince…. But I’m not a millionaire.”

Sources: KVUE, Daily Beast / Photo Credit: WKYC via Daily Mail

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