Society

$50M To Families Of Children Killed by IKEA Dressers

| by David Bonner

Ikea will pay $50 million to the parents of three toddlers who were killed when the company's Malm dressers fell on them.

“We would never want other parents to have to experience what we have been forced to endure,” Janet McGee, one of the parents, said according to the Daily Mail.

McGee’s 22-month-old son Ted died in February when one of the dressers fell on him. “This has been a tragic, heartbreaking season for us and our family, and no amount of money will make up for the loss of our sweet little boy,” she said in an interview with Philly.com.

His was the third death attributed to the dressers. In February 2014, Curren Collas died when he was pinned against his bed by a falling six-drawer Malm chest, reports the Daily Mail. The death of Camden Ellis, in June 2014, was caused by a three-drawer Malm chest.

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All three children were named in the suit, which concluded after Philadelphia Judge John Milton Younge ordered IKEA to disclose documents that it had attempted to keep confidential, the Daily Mail reports.

Regarding the documents, the plaintiff’s attorney Daniel Mann said: “That was important to us and to the families. In the event there are other children this happens to, their families to be able to see what we have seen.”

In addition to paying $50 million to the families, IKEA will also pay $50,000 to three children’s hospitals in the names of the victims.

The suit concluded six months after the company ordered a recall of 29 million Malm units in July, following Ted McGee’s death. That same month, Consumer Reports urged the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission to force a recall of the Malm dresser line.

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“Both IKEA and the CPSC were aware of the safety concerns with this particular furniture line prior to this latest incident,” stated Consumer Reports in its demand, which also noted that the dressers did meet a the furniture industry’s own safety standard, which requires that each dresser drawer, while open, withstand fifty pounds without the unit tipping over.

Sources: Daily Mail, Consumer Reports, Philly.com / Photo Credit: Daily Mail

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