Texas Man Camps Outside Of His $1.3 Million Mansion After Wife Kicks Him Out

| by Daniel Rivera
Sharafat Khan Sharafat Khan

A Seabrook, Texas, man was forced to live on the lawn of his mansion after a dispute with his wife.

Sharafat Khan, 69, has camped out in front of his $1.3 million home for six months after his wife, Shahnaz, 61, threw him out and changed the locks after an argument, KPRC reported.

Khan told the news station he wraps himself in a sheet at night and sleeps on the front porch or in the backyard when he wants privacy. He is not allowed to use the home's bathrooms although he owns half of the property. Police have been unsuccessful in resolving the situation, as they cannot legally force his wife to allow him into the house.

The couple has reportedly been fighting for six years, after Khan was accused of hitting his wife, according to court documents cited by KPRC. Khan said the recent dispute started when he refused to cut ties with some members of his family.

A source close to the couple claimed Khan's wife refuses to file for divorce because she and her husband follow Sharia law, but Khan claims otherwise.

"She doesn't want to hand over half of her fortune," Khan told KPRC.

He says he wants his share of the property but is unable to file for divorce because he does not have access to their money and thus cannot afford a lawyer.

Concerned neighbors have offered their support for Khan by bringing him food and blankets, but his wife reportedly takes them away and has placed signs warning the community against feeding him.

Laurel Stout, who lives across the street from the residence, fears for Khan's life.

"He's very frail, he can't even walk," Stout said. "I'm afraid he is going to to die out here in his yard."

Interpretation of Sharia law is an issue Muslim leaders have struggled to address.

Canadian Muslim leader Dr. David Liepert noted in a blog post for The Huffington Post that Islamic principles stress equality and justice and warns against those who use it to subjugate others.

"Since faith makes us all subject to a Creator who made everyone alongside us to some absolutely good purpose, that requires us to be good for everyone as well, faith is supposed to make us more equal to each other, and make our society more just," Liepart wrote.

"An objective, honest and historically accurate assessment of Muslim history admits that instead of doing that, 'Sharia law' has been based to exactly the opposite purpose for over a thousand years," he added.

Sources: KPRC, The Huffington Post / Photo credit: KPRC, Google Maps via Daily Mail