Society

High Schooler Suspended for Writing 'Yolo' on Test and Tweeting it

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When one Texas high school student went into class to take a standardized test, he was less than enthused. In fact, he was so unmotivated to do the test that he simply didn't do it at all.

Kyron Birdine attends Arlington High School as a junior. The state is trying out a new standardized test called STAAR to replace the old test called TAKS. 

Birdine was graduating under the TAKS test, so had no interest in doing well on the new test.

When he came to the essay portion of the STAAR test, he wrote, "I have the TAKS test to study for, not this unneeded craziness."

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Then, in big letters, wrote "YOLO" with a smiley face and turned it in, not before he snapped a photo of it with his phone, though.

He then tweeted that photo of his essay portion to the Arlington Independent School District and the Texas Education Agency to draw even more attention to himself.

It's not clear whether the tweeting sparked their anger or if the use of "YOLO" did, but Birdine was suspended for four days.

"Basically, [they] said something about it being a 'breach of security,' and that with the breach of security they have to have some sort of punishment," he said.

They also made him delete the tweet.

"Today, there was an incident with a student tweeting a picture of an answer booklet for a STAAR field test," the district wrote. "We have made an initial report of the incident to TEA and will continue to investigate further. The student has been punished in accordance with district disciplinary procedures."

His suspension has some people angry, as a hashtag has already been invented for him, called #FreeKyron.

Others agree that he should have been suspended. 

"I was being a high school kid getting on Twitter," he said. 

His mother thinks they overreacted to his tweet.

"I think it's excessive punishment," she said. "That's the type of punishment you should get for something really severe."

But she believes it serves as a lesson to other students wanting to protest the new test.

"Don't do it," she warned. 

Sources: CNET, WFAA