West Virginia Teacher Nikki Bailey Loses Everything When Bank Wrongfully Repossesses Home

| by Jonathan Wolfe
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We have told you about wrongful house repossessions before, like the case of this Indiana man and Ohio resident Katie Barnett. Wrongful repossessions typically occur when a bank gives a repossession company the wrong address to a house, or when the repossession company goes to an incorrect but similar sounding address. The company then enters the home of a homeowner whose mortgage payments are up to date and seizes everything. Lengthy legal battles often ensue.

News out of West Virginia today is that yet another one of these carless mistakes has happened.

The wrongfully repossessed house was owned by Logan, W. Va., teacher Nikki Bailey. Bailey returned from visiting a friend in the hospital and saw the repossession company leaving her house.

Bailey was shocked when she entered her house.

“Everything was gone,” Bailey said. “Living room furniture, my Marshall diploma, my high school diploma, my pictures  my history. I was teacher of the year. All of that stuff is gone  certificates from that. It's all gone.”

As we’ve seen in other cases before, the repossession company went to a similar  albeit wrong  address. The company was told to remove the belongings from a house on Godby Heights. Bailey lives on Godby Street.

Tim DiPiero, Bailey’s attorney, is now trying to negotiate how much compensation Bailey will receive for the mistake.

“It just seems kind of ridiculous that this actually happened when a phone call could have stopped it,” DiPiero said.

Bailey asked the repossession company where her belongings had been taken. They told her everything was taken to a dump.

In addition securing Bailey’s compensation, DiPiero is trying to find out exactly how the mistake occurred. Not only did the repossession company go to the wrong address, but the address they were given by the bank was not accurate either.

Even if Bailey is compensated generously for her troubles, it will be nearly impossible to recreate many of the more personal items taken from her house. 

Sources: WSAZ, Daily Mail