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Unredacted WikiLeaks Documents Available Online

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

Unredacted versions of the documents released by WikiLeaks are now available online thanks to a "security breach."

According to a report on PaidContent.org, a Twitter user has published unedited versions of some 250,000 secret U.S. diplomatic cables. When WikiLeaks released the documents, it worked with several news agencies and redacted sensitive information.

The report said:

The Twitter user is believed to have found the information after acting on hints published in several media outlets and on the WikiLeaks Twitter feed, all of which cited a member of rival whistleblowing website OpenLeaks as the original source of the tipoffs.

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WikiLeaks blames one of those news agencies, the British newspaper The Guardian, which published a book about WikiLeaks. WikiLeaks said in a statement on Twitter:

Guardian journalist has, in a previously undetected act of gross negligence or malice, and in violation of a signed security agreement with the Guardian‘s editor-in-chief Alan Rusbridger, disclosed top secret decryption passwords to the entire, unredacted, WikiLeaks Cablegate archive. We have already spoken to the state department and commenced pre-litigation action. We will issue a formal statement in due course.

The Guardian denies WikiLeaks’ allegations.

It’s nonsense to suggest the Guardian‘s WikiLeaks book has compromised security in any way. Our book about WikiLeaks was published last February. It contained a password, but no details of the location of the files, and we were told it was a temporary password which would expire and be deleted in a matter of hours.

It was a meaningless piece of information to anyone except the person(s) who created the database. No concerns were expressed when the book was published and if anyone at WikiLeaks had thought this compromised security they have had seven months to remove the files. That they didn’t do so clearly shows the problem was not caused by the Guardian‘s book.