New Evidence of Adolf Hitler's Long-Lost Son?

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

A French magazine says it has new evidence that a man who claimed he was the long-lost son of Adolf Hitler was telling the truth.

In 1981 Jean-Marie Loret wrote a book called "Your Father's Name is Hitler" in which he said his mother told him on her death bed that his father was the notorious Nazi leader.

The woman told Loret that she was a teenager in France during World War I when she met Hitler, then a young German soldier. The two had a relationship and in 1918 Loret was born.

She said Hitler never acknowledged being the father, but she said the two wrote to each other throughout the years and that he sent her money.

Loret wrote that he never knew who his father was while growing up, only knowing that he was a German soldier. Loret later went on to fight against the Germans during World War II.

Shortly after the war Loret learned the truth, and he went to his own grave in 1985 believing Hitler was his father.

Many dispute this. Several years ago Belgium journalist Jean-Paul Mulders said he collected DNA samples from Loret and Hitler's known relatives, and they did not match.

But the French magazine Le Point reports that new evidence could back up Loret's claim, such as the fact that Hitler and Loret belong to the same blood group and that their handwritings are similar.

Loret's book will soon be republished with the new evidence.