Headlines

Huge Air Bag Recall for Toyota, Honda and Nissan

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht

More than 2 million Toyota, Nissan, and Honda vehicles are being recalled over concerns of faulty passenger side air bags, which could rupture while inflating.

Toyota is recalling 1.7 million vehicles globally. 430 models manufactured by Toyota are affected, including the Corolla, Corolla Matrix, Lexus SC, Sequoia and Tundra produced between Nov. 2000 and Mar. 2004.

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Toyota claimed it received five reports, three in the U.S. and two in Japan, of faulty air bags, but there were no injuries.

At least 170,000 Toyota vehicles in the U.S. have the defect, but the automaker will have to inspect 580,000 vehicles to find those effected. Toyota is recalling 320,000 vehicles in Japan and another 490,000 in Europe.

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Honda is recalling 1.1 million vehicles, 680,000 of which are in North America, 270,000 in Japan, and 64,000 in Europe. The Honda Civic, CR-V and Odyssey are included.

Nissan is recalling 480,000 vehicles across the globe, 137,000 in Japan alone. While North American and European cars will be affected, Nissan did not have those number immediately available. They are recalling the Cube, Maxima, Teana, and X-Trail.

The air bag problem was reported to the Transport Ministry in Japan and automakers expect to report other recalls in other regions later in the day.

The air bags were made by Takata Corp. in Japan, which has also recalled air bags from non-Japanese manufacturers, according to Takata spokesman Akiko Watanabe on Thursday.

In the Thursday recall, Toyota blamed the manufacturer for the defect, in which a “propellant wafer” could cause the passenger air bag inflator to burst and deploy abnormally during a crash.

Honda says the defect came from two human errors during production. Honda spokeswoman Akemi Ando said improperly stored parts were exposed to humidity and that a worker failed to turn on a system that discards defective products.

Sources: USA Today, CBS News