Hacker Exposes Rape, Faces Longer Sentence Than Rapists

| by Michael Doherty
A photo of Deric Lostutter.A photo of Deric Lostutter.

A man who allegedly hacked a website to expose a high school girl's rapists has been charged with violating federal computer laws, and if convicted, faces a sentence eight times as long as that of the rapists.

On July 7, Deric Lostutter, who went by the name KYAnonymous online and associated himself with the hacker group Anonymous, was indicted by a federal grand jury on four felony counts, including charges of hacking and making false statements to authorities.

In 2013, Lostutter and an unnamed co-conspirator who went by the online name JustBatCat, reportedly leaked evidence that shed light on a 2012 Ohio rape case, in which a 16-year-old girl from West Virginia was raped by two Steubenville High School football players. The two rape suspects were convicted early in 2013.

The case received national attention after incriminating photos, emails and social media messages exchanged by the rapists, and allegedly obtained by Lostutter, surfaced. Lostutter also allegedly reposted a video, made by the rapists and their friends, which proved that the victim was unconscious and unable to consent, according to the MintPress News.

Lostutter then reportedly made a video in which he wore a mask and threatened to "disclose the personal identifying information of Steubenville High School students."

The two convicted rapists, Trent Mays and Ma'lik Richmond, received two years and one year, respectively, in juvenile detention for the sexual assault.

Three years later, Lostutter faces up to 16 years in jail for the alleged hacking of a website and an email account that led to the photos and emails being leaked.

Tor Ekeland, Lostutter's attorney, expressed surprise that the indictment came three years after the FBI raided Lostutter's house in connection with the Steubenville rape case.

"I don't understand why they are prosecuting somebody ... who basically helped expose the rape of a minor," Ekeland said, adding that the harm caused by the hacking was minimal, the Daily Mail reports.

In 2013, Lostutter told the Lexington Herald-Leader that while he had posted the information online, someone else had done the actual hacking.

Mays and Richmond were released in 2015. Richmond's family released a statement after his release focusing on how hard the sentence was for Ma'Lik, which the rape victim's attorney noted did not contain any apology to the girl, the MintPress News reports.

"Although everyone hopes convicted criminals are rehabilitated, it is disheartening that this convicted rapist’s press release does not make a single reference to the victim and her family," said Robert Fitzsimmons, the victim's attorney.

A summons has ordered Lostutter to appear in court on August 9.

Source: Daily Mail, Lexington Herald-Leader, MintPress News / Photo Credit: Deric Lostutter/Facebook via Daily Mail

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