Society

USPS Ammo Purchase Increases Concerns Over Federal Stockpiling

| by Will Hagle

The United States Postal Service joins the Department of Education and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as the latest federal agency to announce a major purchase of ammunition. 

Many federal agencies have been forming independent law enforcement divisions to govern their specific branches, and the recent stockpiling trend has led to the purchase of billions of rounds of ammunition by various federal agencies. 

Despite concerns of secretive dealings, the USPS’s announcement that it will be buying ammunition was made transparent in a post on the Federal Business Opportunities website in early January. The notice begins: “The United States Postal Service intends to solicit proposals for assorted small arms ammunition.” It goes on to explain how organizations can participate in the solicitation. 

According to InfoWars, the department has since claimed that the purchase is a “standard purchase” of ammunition necessary for use by the Postal Police. 

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Critics and conspiracy theorists, however, claim that various branches of the federal government are becoming increasingly militarized and are buying up ammunition in order to stop regular citizens from being able to purchase it. According to NewsMax, the Social Security Administration requested 174,000 rounds of “.357 Sig 125 grain bonded jacketed hollow-point” bullets about a year ago. The Department of Agriculture and the Department of Homeland Security have recently requested similarly large amounts of ammunition. 

Many critics acknowledge that these purchases are most likely not being made for the conspiratorial purpose of stealing ammunition away from regular citizens.

“Most of these agencies do have their own police forces,” said Jim Wallace, executive director of the Gun Owners’ Action League.

Still, many Second Amendment activists find fault in the practice. 

“What’s the need for that?" said Philip Van Cleave, president of the Virginia Citizens Defense League. "Do we really need this? That was something our Founding Fathers did not like and we should all be concerned about."