Society

New ‘Smart Gun’ Technology Could Disable Weapons Remotely

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A new controller that would alert gun owners when their weapon was being moved and give them the ability to disable it remotely made its debut at a wireless technology conference in Las Vegas on Tuesday.

The new system, which was introduced by Yardarm Technologies, would trigger an alarm on an owner's cellphone if their gun was moved. The owner could then simply tap a button to activate the weapon’s safety and disable it.

The new technology would function with the aid of a microchip and antennas. It is estimated that the extra security measures would add about $50 to the cost of a gun and about $12 a year for the service.

Stewart said his company has an exclusive network to avoid hackers and spotty wireless systems after questions about privacy issues with regard to the system were raised.

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"The idea is to connect gun owners more directly with their guns, no matter what the circumstance," said Yardarm CEO Robert Stewart. "Suppose you and your family are on vacation in Las Vegas, and your firearm is back at home. Wouldn’t you want to know in real time if an intruder or worse, a child is handling your gun?"

Other “smart guns” include the iGun, which only fires if it recognizes a ring on a finger, and the Intelligun, which uses a fingerprint locking system. The idea for smart guns has been around for years, but some have complained that they place limitations on Second Amendment rights.

National Rifle Association spokesman Andrew Arulanandam said his organization is concerned about the reliability and cost of smart guns, The Huffington Post reported.

"We believe that the technology does not exist today where a so-called smart gun can operate with 100 percent or close to it reliability," he said, "and a firearm that does not function when it is required to is not a smart gun." He added that the added costs are "a luxury tax on self-defense.”

Sources: The Huffington Post, Motherboard