Society

New Poll Finds 62% of Americans Want Senate to Drop Gun Control

| by Dabney Bailey
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A new nationwide poll has by Reason-Rupe has found that 62 percent of Americans want the Senate to drop gun control and move on to other issues. That could be bad news for pro-gun control Democrats like President Barack Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, who have said that they are still fighting for stronger gun control laws.

The results are unexpected – a short while ago, a widely publicized Gallup poll found that 83 percent of Americans favored universal background checks on all gun purchase.

Perhaps Americans are getting sick of the gun control debate, even though the majority of Americans apparently support stronger gun control laws. Unfortunately, the poll doesn’t go into detail about participants’ motivation for voting the way that they did, but it does offer insight into which political groups are still in the gun control fight.

Unsurprisingly, liberals were the group most likely to vote in favor of revisiting the gun control debate. A full 62 percent of liberals voted in favor of continuing the fight. Only 14 percent of conservatives, on the other hand, were willing to hear more arguments about gun control.

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African Americans were the ethnic group most likely to vote in favor of revisiting the debate at 45 percent, though race was not a strong determining factor. By comparison, Latinos and Asian/Other were most likely to oppose gun control at 30 percent.

With numbers like these, it’s clear that gun control advocates will have a hard fight ahead. Gun control proponents seemingly had the support of the majority of Americans when they pushed for universal background checks, but they may have missed their golden opportunity. Now that the bill has been defeated, Americans seem more interested in moving on to more pressing matters.

Should legislators continue to push forward in support of the 83 percent of Americans who want universal background checks, or are they better off responding to the 62 percent of Americans who want lawmakers to move on to other issues?

Source: Reason